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Alison Doyle

How to Keep Your Seasonal Job

By December 29, 2012

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Companies that hire seasonal workers often give priority to returning workers, both for full-time positions and for jobs the next year.  I know some people who have had the same seasonal jobs for years, picking up where they left off last season.

How can you hang on to your seasonal job or turn it into a permanent position?  Carolyn Hughes, VP of People at SimplyHired.com, shares her tips for keeping your seasonal job and for combining seasonal jobs so you're working year round.

How to Keep Your Seasonal Job

  • Winter Job + Spring Job + Summer Job + Fall Job = Full-Time. If you find seasonal work that you love in the winter, work hard so that you are in a good position to go back to that job the following winter. Do the same for spring, summer or autumn work, and pretty soon you may find yourself with a seasonal job for each season that you are welcome to go back to year after year. Your loyalty will be appreciated, your pay will likely be better than entry level. Best of all, your expertise will position you as a leader in the organizations for which you are working.
  • Act the Part. Act like a full-time employee every day.   Smile, socialize, anticipate next steps... pretty soon the temporary job may become full-time because your new colleagues do not know what they would do without you.
  • Make Yourself Indispensable, Make Connections. Temp work, volunteering and internships are a great way to get a temporary foot in the door at companies you respect. Show up every day and prove your worth, and you may get that job offer you've dreamed of at the company of your choice. 

Related: Temporary Jobs | Seasonal Jobs

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